Port of Brunswick commercial vessel traffic opens 24 hours

The Unified Command, working with the Georgia Ports Authority, expanded commercial vessel traffic operations to 24 hours in the Port of Brunswick on Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019.

“Reopening the Port of Brunswick to around-the-clock transit means greater flexibility for the shipping lines that call on Brunswick, and more timely service for auto manufacturers and other cargo owners,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “We want to thank the Coast Guard, the Brunswick Pilots and all of our partners who have worked tirelessly to bring us to this point.”

The channel will be open to one way traffic as inbound and outbound commercial vessels will have to pass one at a time for the safety of response crews working to prepare the M/V Golden Ray for removal.

“We appreciate the continuing partnership with the Georgia Ports Authority, Brunswick Port and Moran Towing,” said Commander Norm Witt, Federal On Scene Coordinator. “While removing the M/V Golden Ray will take time, minimizing the impact of this incident on the community and protecting the environment are priorities for the Unified Command.”

The St. Simons Sound Incident Unified Command is the official source for information regarding the M/V Golden Ray response operations.

An inbound cargo vessel passes by a work barge next to the M/V Golden Ray, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019. The Unified Command, working with the Georgia Ports Authority, expanded commercial vessel traffic operations to 24 hours at the Port of Brunswick.

Keep our crews safe by not flying drones over or near the Golden Ray

The wreck site is located within 5 nautical miles of an airport. Therefore, drones are prohibited without written authorization from the FAA in Class E airspace per Title 14 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) part 107. For more information visit https://bit.ly/33MXPWa

As response crews continue to lighter and prepare the M/V Golden Ray for removal, please don’t fly drones over or near the wreck site. Our crews are working under very challenging conditions and a drone can be a distraction or impede the operation of heavy equipment.

Thank you for your cooperation, St. Simons Sound Unified Command.

 

 

Photo Release: Marsh Cleanup

Response crews collect oiled debris from marshes, as well as trash near the Port of Brunswick, Georgia, Nov. 4, 2019. When or if shorelines become oiled, cleanup crews must determine the best methods to address impacts to the environment which include standard protocols for removing any trash unrelated to an incident.

Photo Release: Rappelling into the Golden Ray

Response crews repel into the hull of M/V Golden Ray and clear a path for oil spill equipment to safely remove oil from the steering gear room, St. Simons Sound, Georgia, Nov. 5, 2019. The complex pollution recovery and mitigation operations in a ship of this magnitude demands methodical planning and meticulous execution.

Response crews repel into the hull of M/V Golden Ray and clear a path for oil spill equipment to safely remove oil from the steering gear room, St. Simons Sound, Georgia, Nov. 5, 2019. The complex pollution recovery and mitigation operations in a ship of this magnitude demands methodical planning and meticulous execution.

Sidney Lanier Park Boat Ramp Reopens for Public Use

Staging area crews reconfigure the worksite to enable public access to the Sidney Lanier Park Boat Ramp Nov. 5, 2019.

The municipal boat ramp beneath the Sidney Lanier Bridge in Brunswick reopened to the public.

The boat ramp was closed while response crews from the Unified Command utilized it to conduct operations related to the capsizing of the M/V Golden Ray in the St. Simons Sound. The public is urged to use caution in the area as response crews will still be operating.

The public should use the second entrance where an attendant will assist with traffic flow. The ramp has been impacted by operations, but will be restored once the work is complete.

A list of all available boat ramps can be found at CoastalGaDNR.org/AllBoatRamps. Anyone with questions may contact CRD at 912-264-7218.

Photo Release: Air Quality Monitoring

Unified Command response team members Jeff Walker, left, and Sam Atazadeh, air quality specialists, record data from readings taken on multi-gas-monitors, St. Simons Island, Georgia, Oct. 30, 2019. The St. Simons Sound Incident Unified Command conducted daily air quality monitoring in real-time to ensure the safety of the public in the communities surrounding the capsized M/V Golden Ray.

Photo Release: Rock Blanket

A knuckle boom excavator picks up 1-to-3-inch rock-aggregate from a container barge in St. Simons Sound, Georgia, Oct. 29, 2019. The excavator guided by sonar and GPS, strategically places the rock next to the hull of the M/V Golden Ray to slow erosion.

Unified Command response crews begin operations to reduce further erosion of the seafloor around the M/V Golden Ray in St. Simons Sound, Georgia, Oct. 29, 2019. Sonar and GPS technology guide a knuckle boom excavator as it places 1-to-3-inch rock-aggregate next to the hull of the vessel to slow erosion.

Unified Command response crews begin operations to reduce further erosion by placing a rock “blanket” adjacent to the hull of the M/V Golden Ray in St. Simons Sound, Georgia, Oct. 29, 2019. Sonar and GPS technology guide a knuckle boom excavator as it places 1-to-3-inch rock-aggregate next to the hull.

Unified Command Continues St. Simons Sound Incident Response: Update 28

Date: 10.26.19

Contact: Joint Information Center (912) 944-7122

Unified Command response crews will strategically place rocks next to the hull of the M/V Golden Ray to slow down erosion around the vessel starting October 28, 2019.

Strong area tidal currents in the sound have been causing erosion and transporting sediment. Once the vessel is completely dismantled and transferred out of the sound, the rocks will be removed using excavators with sieve buckets.

Trucks are delivering approximately 6,000 tons of rock from several rock quarries located within the state of Georgia. When operations begin, the rock will be transported by barge and placed on the seafloor using knuckle boom excavators and GPS for accuracy. Sonar technology will be used to guide the placement of the 1-to-3 inch aggregate rocks next to the hull of the vessel in real time.

The Army Corps of Engineers and the Georgia Department of Natural Resources have reviewed and approved the operation while engineers work to finalize a vessel removal plan.

“We appreciate everyone’s patience as plans are developed to remove the ship and its cargo from the waterway,” said Federal On Scene Coordinator Norman Witt, Coast Guard commander for the Unified Command. “Response crews are working seven days a week, weather permitting, to prepare the motor vessel Golden Ray for removal.”

Representatives from the U.S. Coast Guard, the State of Georgia, Gallagher Marine Systems, and other local partners continue to work diligently to ensure the safety of its responders and the surrounding community.

The established 150-yard safety zone around the M/V Golden Ray remains in effect and commercial traffic impact has been minimal.

The St. Simons Sound Incident Unified Command is the official source of information for the M/V Golden Ray response operations.

 

Unit Manager Reid Jackson of the Georgia Environmental Protection Division, walks past a mound of gravel, Brunswick, Georgia, Oct. 25, 2019. The 1-to-3 inch rock-mixture was staged for deployment and later placed next to the hull of the M/V Golden Ray in order to slow down erosion around the vessel.

 

Unit Manager Reid Jackson of the Georgia Environmental Protection Division holds a piece of rock delivered to the staging area in Brunswick, Georgia, Oct. 25, 2019. The 1-to-3 inch rock-mixture was staged for deployment and later placed next to the hull of the M/V Golden Ray in order to slow down erosion around the vessel.